A critical enzyme that permits brain communications is randomly turning on and off, even taking hours-long “breaks from work.” These discoveries might have a significant influence on our knowledge of the brain and the development of medications.
Washington: University of Copenhagen researchers have uncovered an astounding finding that will help them learn more about the mammalian brain.
Specifically, a critical enzyme that permits brain communications is randomly switching on and off, even taking hours-long “breaks from work.” These discoveries might have a significant influence on our knowledge of the brain and the development of medications. The finding is featured on the cover of Nature today.
Millions of neurons are continually communicating with one another, shaping thoughts and memories and allowing us to move our bodies at will. Neurotransmitters are transferred from one neuron to another by a specific enzyme when two neurons meet to convey a message.
This mechanism is necessary for neural transmission as well as the survival of all complex creatures. Until today, experts throughout the world assumed that these enzymes were always active, sending vital messages. However, this is not the case.
Researchers from the University of Copenhagen’s Department of Chemistry closely studied the enzyme and discovered that its activity switches on and off at random intervals, contradicting our previous understanding.
This is the very first time anybody has investigated mammalian brain enzymes one molecule at a time, and the results are astounding. Unlike many other proteins, these enzymes can stop operating for minutes to hours, contrary to widespread perception. Nonetheless, the brains of humans and other animals operate amazingly “Professor Dimitrios Stamou, director of the Centre for Geometrically Engineered Cellular Systems at the University of Copenhagen’s Department of Chemistry, led the research.
Until date, such research was conducted using relatively stable bacterial enzymes. For the first time, the researchers analysed mammalian enzymes extracted from rats’ brains using the novel technology. Today, the work has been published and is featured on the cover of the prestigious scientific magazine Nature.
Enzyme switching might have far-reaching consequences for neural transmission. Neurotransmitters help neurons interact. Neurotransmitters are initially injected into tiny membrane bladders to relay signals between neurons (called synaptic vesicles). The bladders function as receptacles that hold neurotransmitters and release them between two neurons only when a message is needed.
V- ATPase, the study’s primary enzyme, is in charge of giving energy to the neurotransmitter pumps in these containers. Neurotransmitters would not be poured into the containers without it, and the containers would be unable to convey signals between neurons.
However, the study shows that each container has just one enzyme; if this enzyme is turned off, there is no more energy to drive the loading of neurotransmitters into the containers. This is a completely unexpected and novel discovery.
“It’s almost inconceivable that the critically important procedure of loading neurotransmitters into containers is entrusted to only one molecule per container. Especially since we discovered that 40% of the time these molecules are turned off “Professor Dimitrios Stamou states
A novel technique for screening medicines for the V-ATPase
Because it plays key roles in cancer, cancer metastasis, and various other life-threatening disorders, the V-ATPase enzyme is an important therapeutic target. As a result, the V-ATPase is a promising target for anticancer therapy development.
Existing V-ATPase drug screening methods rely on simultaneously averaging the signal from billions of enzymes. Knowing the average impact of a medicine is adequate as long as an enzyme functions in real time or in huge numbers of enzymes.

Scientists make a significant discovery concerning mammalian brains.

A critical enzyme that permits brain communications is randomly turning on and off, even taking hours-long “breaks from work.” These discoveries might have a significant influence on our knowledge of the brain and the development of medications.
Washington: University of Copenhagen researchers have uncovered an astounding finding that will help them learn more about the mammalian brain.
Specifically, a critical enzyme that permits brain communications is randomly switching on and off, even taking hours-long “breaks from work.” These discoveries might have a significant influence on our knowledge of the brain and the development of medications. The finding is featured on the cover of Nature today.
Millions of neurons are continually communicating with one another, shaping thoughts and memories and allowing us to move our bodies at will. Neurotransmitters are transferred from one neuron to another by a specific enzyme when two neurons meet to convey a message.
This mechanism is necessary for neural transmission as well as the survival of all complex creatures. Until today, experts throughout the world assumed that these enzymes were always active, sending vital messages. However, this is not the case.
Researchers from the University of Copenhagen’s Department of Chemistry closely studied the enzyme and discovered that its activity switches on and off at random intervals, contradicting our previous understanding.
This is the very first time anybody has investigated mammalian brain enzymes one molecule at a time, and the results are astounding. Unlike many other proteins, these enzymes can stop operating for minutes to hours, contrary to widespread perception. Nonetheless, the brains of humans and other animals operate amazingly “Professor Dimitrios Stamou, director of the Centre for Geometrically Engineered Cellular Systems at the University of Copenhagen’s Department of Chemistry, led the research.
Until date, such research was conducted using relatively stable bacterial enzymes. For the first time, the researchers analysed mammalian enzymes extracted from rats’ brains using the novel technology. Today, the work has been published and is featured on the cover of the prestigious scientific magazine Nature.
Enzyme switching might have far-reaching consequences for neural transmission. Neurotransmitters help neurons interact. Neurotransmitters are initially injected into tiny membrane bladders to relay signals between neurons (called synaptic vesicles). The bladders function as receptacles that hold neurotransmitters and release them between two neurons only when a message is needed.
V- ATPase, the study’s primary enzyme, is in charge of giving energy to the neurotransmitter pumps in these containers. Neurotransmitters would not be poured into the containers without it, and the containers would be unable to convey signals between neurons.
However, the study shows that each container has just one enzyme; if this enzyme is turned off, there is no more energy to drive the loading of neurotransmitters into the containers. This is a completely unexpected and novel discovery.
“It’s almost inconceivable that the critically important procedure of loading neurotransmitters into containers is entrusted to only one molecule per container. Especially since we discovered that 40% of the time these molecules are turned off “Professor Dimitrios Stamou states
A novel technique for screening medicines for the V-ATPase
Because it plays key roles in cancer, cancer metastasis, and various other life-threatening disorders, the V-ATPase enzyme is an important therapeutic target. As a result, the V-ATPase is a promising target for anticancer therapy development.
Existing V-ATPase drug screening methods rely on simultaneously averaging the signal from billions of enzymes. Knowing the average impact of a medicine is adequate as long as an enzyme functions in real time or in huge numbers of enzymes.

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